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Shrimp Fishery Moves Forward

Bill Aims To Establish Shrimp Fishery Pilot Program Mar 14,2022 by Shawn Soper OCEAN CITY – A bill in the Maryland General Assembly that would clarify the rules for developing a shrimp fishery pilot program in the state with implications for the resort area and the Lower Shore got favorable reports this week from state Senate and House committees. Shrimp, a staple in most resort area restaurants in many forms, has heretofore always been considered a southern transport and hasn’t been targeted for commercial harvesting in Maryland. However, in recent years, shrimp have been showing up more and more in local waters, off the Atlantic coastline and in the lower end of the Chesapeake Bay. To that end, last year the Maryland General Assembly passed legislation that would allow the Department of Natural Resources (DNR) to create a pilot program to establish a commercial shrimp fishery in the state. Last year’s bill established a potential pilot program for a commercial shrimp industry. This year, a companion bill now filed in the Senate and House will create a framework by which the pilot program could be implemented by the DNR. Sponsored by State Senator Mary Beth Carozza and others, Senate Bill 537 had its first hearing this week in the Education, Health and Environmental Affairs Committee, which responded with a favorable report on Monday. The cross-filed House Bill 1149 also got a favorable report from the Environment and Transportation Committee. “This bill is clarifying the Department of Natural Resources authority to adopt regulations for the new shrimp fishery,” Carozza said during testimony. “You may recall, the Maryland General Assembly with the support of this committee passed a bill last session to create a new shrimp fishery requiring licensing and gave the DNR broad authority to manage the fishery.” Carozza during the committee hearing explained a commercial shrimp fishery in Maryland had not been considered before and there is no licensing procedure or regulations in place. “Previous commercial shrimp harvesting was believed to be only feasible in southern waters,” she said. “However, recent findings have concluded that shrimp are in our Atlantic coast waters and harvesting them will create a new economic boost as well as contribute to local and state revenues.” Carozza said during testimony there is a renewed interest in developing a commercial shrimp harvesting industry locally. “During these current uncertain times with supply chain issues and food shortages, our commercial seafood harvesters consistently provide local, relatively inexpensive, unprocessed healthy food choices,” she said. “Our watermen are taking a risk when they engage in a new fishery. They deserve our support in making this pilot program a workable, flexible alternative.” Carozza called on longtime Ocean City commercial fisherman Sonny Gwin, captain of the Skilligalee out of the West Ocean City harbor, to testify on behalf of the legislation. “As a lifelong commercial fisherman, I fish for lobsters down in Ocean City, Maryland,” he said. “When I come in, the tourists and consumers alike come down to enjoy fresh lobsters right off my boat.” Gwin said during the hearing the same situation could evolve if Senate Bill 537 is approved and a commercial shrimp industry is created in Maryland. “Now that we’re seeing shrimp along our coast, we would to see the DNR have the authority to allow us to catch and sell these shrimp, just as we’ve been doing right off the boat so the tourists and consumers can enjoy them just like they are enjoying seafood down in Ocean City for a lot of years,” he said. Maryland Oystermen’s Association President Jim Mullin testified the current bill would establish a framework for creating a regulated commercial shrimp industry in the state. “We are in favor of this bill since the shrimp fishery is an emerging new industry,” he said. “It’s beginning to provide some guidance moving forward for setting up the goals and objectives for a sustainable fishery. This bill could help set up some comprehensive plan may or some type of bylaws. It is very helpful moving forward to set the structure up.” Carozza said Senate Bill 537 is the next step in the process to create a commercial shrimp industry in Maryland. “Last year, we passed legislation that established a shrimp fishery, which was the first step,” she said. “Now, we’re coming back to say we need to put the guidelines and regulations in place for the second step to move forward with the pilot program.” Maryland Watermen’s Association President Robert Brown said vessels are currently catching shrimp, but without regulations and licensing, it’s not targeted at this point. “Right now, it’s a bycatch,” he said. “There are no regulations on the emerging shrimp fishery.  It doesn’t say we can’t keep them, but it does say we can sell them. There is no license for them or regulations.” Recorded Testimony

Opioid Treatment

MARYLAND, – “This opioid crisis deserves the same attention and focus as we’ve given to the COVID-19 pandemic,” State Senator MaryBeth Carozza said. That attention comes in the form of legislation as Senate Bill 394, the Statewide Target Overdose Prevention Act, increases the use and access to Naloxone which is used to help reverse the effects of an opioid overdose. The STOP Act, which was originally introduced in 2015, made its way back to the current legislative session. Lawmakers hopes this push will saving as many lives as possible. “This legislation that Governor Hogan introduced is really a powerful tool allowing us to use this miracle drug to save lives  for those who have been most impacted by opioids and opioid abuse,” Senator Carozza said. “Sometimes there’s spikes and jumps with our fatal overdoses in particular locally and a lot of that we think is due to the availability of Narcan and Naloxone,” Worcester County Health Department’s Travis Brown said. Health experts say that while this expanding access is crucial in the fight to saving lives, the focus must be on the full recovery journey. “They’re so many people in our community that can overcome and well manage their substance abuse but unfortunately they just take a medication with no treatment,” Clinical Psychiatrist for Peninsula Mental Health Services’ Michael Finegan, PhD, ABPP. “Whenever we see Narcan and Naloxone in distribution we also want to pair it with resources. We have our safe stations here locally where people can enter recovery immediately,” Brown said. I’m told that help doesn’t have to be left to the professionals. “You never know if you’re going to be walking through a parking lot or a department store and might encounter someone having an overdose. If you have Narcan and Naloxone with you and know how to use it, you might just save that persons life,” Brown said. The Worcester County Health Department offers Naloxone training for free and provides other opioid addiction resources for those who need them.  To find our more information, call the health department at (410)-632-1100 or click here  The STOP Act is currently sits in the Senate Finance Committee. The next hearing will be on February 17th. For full story & video: Maryland lawmakers tackle opioid crisis with new legislation - 47abc (wmdt.com)

K_9 Legislation Saves Canine service dog lives

New legislation could better protect Md. K9s injured in the line of duty February 1, 2022   Hannah Cechini MARYLAND – New legislation could mean the difference between life and death for Maryland K9 officers. No Clear Guidelines As it stands right now, if a K9 is hurt while responding to a scene, there aren’t any guidelines for how to give them emergency care. “We would put them in our patrol cars and we get them to the urgent veterinary care as fast as we could,” said DFC Nicole Chaffey with the Wicomico County Sheriff’s Office. Peace of Mind But, Senate Bill 70 creates guidelines for EMS providers to render emergency treatment to K9s injured in the line of duty. “This is my best friend, this is my partner, this is somebody who’s going to go into the thick of things. We’re going to be the first through the door, and he’s going to be right there with me,” said DFC Chaffey. “Now I know that if there’s an incident and a tragedy, they’re going to get the care just like we’re going to get the care.” Bill sponsor State Senator Mary Beth Carozza says not only will the guidelines save K9 lives, they could also help protect law enforcement officers, too. “In those instances where our police canines are injured in the line of duty, we’ll know that emergency medics can come on the scene, treat the dog, and then transport them safely in an ambulance,” she said. “The proper protocols are in place, but also that liability protection is in place. So, we can allow for that emergency medical care.” Whittington and Wicomico County Sheriff Mike Lewis testified in support of the bill before the Education, Health, and Environmental Affairs Committee. Whittington says the legislation could pave the way to make first responders better prepared for any situation. “Having clear direction and expectations from Maryland Emergency Medical Services, veterinarians, and also the canine handlers allows for us the life-saving care, and the correct care, to the canine unit.” Four Legs on the Front Lines K9s are often some of the first to enter an emergency situation or crime scene, according to first responders and law enforcement. That could lead to potentially deadly situations for the K9 and its handler. “They may be put in situations where they may walk over glass or they may be shot or stabbed. They may experience a fentanyl overdose from walking on a drug or anything like that,” said Ryan Whittington with the Ocean City Fire Department. Sheriff Lewis says the legislation is timely, as K9s getting injured in the line of duty has been a growing concern. “There’s been a major uptick in assaults on law enforcement officers across the country, and our canines. Just last month [in Seattle], we had a police canine – Canine Jedi – that was stabbed to death with a machete,” he said. “To be able to get our four legged partners the assistance they need – that they’ve always needed – is very exciting.” Confidence in Passage The bill is now onto its second reading. Sen. Carozza says there may be some future amendments. However, because other states have passed similar laws, she’s confident Governor Larry Hogan will put his pen to this bill, as well. “This bill enjoys strong support across the board. It has the support of law enforcement, it has the support of firefighters, it has the support of veterinarians,” she said. For full story and video: https://www.wmdt.com/2022/02/new-legislation-could-better-protect-md-k9s-injured-in-the-line-of-duty/    

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Shrimp Fishery Moves Forward

Bill Aims To Establish Shrimp Fishery Pilot Program

OCEAN CITY – A bill in the Maryland General Assembly that would clarify the rules for developing a shrimp fishery pilot program in the state with implications for the resort area and the Lower Shore got favorable reports this week from state Senate and House committees.

Shrimp, a staple in most resort area restaurants in many forms, has heretofore always been considered a southern transport and hasn’t been targeted for commercial harvesting in Maryland. However, in recent years, shrimp have been showing up more and more in local waters, off the Atlantic coastline and in the lower end of the Chesapeake Bay.

To that end, last year the Maryland General Assembly passed legislation that would allow the Department of Natural Resources (DNR) to create a pilot program to establish a commercial shrimp fishery in the state. Last year’s bill established a potential pilot program for a commercial shrimp industry.

This year, a companion bill now filed in the Senate and House will create a framework by which the pilot program could be implemented by the DNR. Sponsored by State Senator Mary Beth Carozza and others, Senate Bill 537 had its first hearing this week in the Education, Health and Environmental Affairs Committee, which responded with a favorable report on Monday. The cross-filed House Bill 1149 also got a favorable report from the Environment and Transportation Committee.

“This bill is clarifying the Department of Natural Resources authority to adopt regulations for the new shrimp fishery,” Carozza said during testimony. “You may recall, the Maryland General Assembly with the support of this committee passed a bill last session to create a new shrimp fishery requiring licensing and gave the DNR broad authority to manage the fishery.”

Carozza during the committee hearing explained a commercial shrimp fishery in Maryland had not been considered before and there is no licensing procedure or regulations in place.

“Previous commercial shrimp harvesting was believed to be only feasible in southern waters,” she said. “However, recent findings have concluded that shrimp are in our Atlantic coast waters and harvesting them will create a new economic boost as well as contribute to local and state revenues.”

Carozza said during testimony there is a renewed interest in developing a commercial shrimp harvesting industry locally.

“During these current uncertain times with supply chain issues and food shortages, our commercial seafood harvesters consistently provide local, relatively inexpensive, unprocessed healthy food choices,” she said. “Our watermen are taking a risk when they engage in a new fishery. They deserve our support in making this pilot program a workable, flexible alternative.”

Carozza called on longtime Ocean City commercial fisherman Sonny Gwin, captain of the Skilligalee out of the West Ocean City harbor, to testify on behalf of the legislation.

“As a lifelong commercial fisherman, I fish for lobsters down in Ocean City, Maryland,” he said. “When I come in, the tourists and consumers alike come down to enjoy fresh lobsters right off my boat.”

Gwin said during the hearing the same situation could evolve if Senate Bill 537 is approved and a commercial shrimp industry is created in Maryland.

“Now that we’re seeing shrimp along our coast, we would to see the DNR have the authority to allow us to catch and sell these shrimp, just as we’ve been doing right off the boat so the tourists and consumers can enjoy them just like they are enjoying seafood down in Ocean City for a lot of years,” he said.

Maryland Oystermen’s Association President Jim Mullin testified the current bill would establish a framework for creating a regulated commercial shrimp industry in the state.

“We are in favor of this bill since the shrimp fishery is an emerging new industry,” he said. “It’s beginning to provide some guidance moving forward for setting up the goals and objectives for a sustainable fishery. This bill could help set up some comprehensive plan may or some type of bylaws. It is very helpful moving forward to set the structure up.”

Carozza said Senate Bill 537 is the next step in the process to create a commercial shrimp industry in Maryland.

“Last year, we passed legislation that established a shrimp fishery, which was the first step,” she said. “Now, we’re coming back to say we need to put the guidelines and regulations in place for the second step to move forward with the pilot program.”

Maryland Watermen’s Association President Robert Brown said vessels are currently catching shrimp, but without regulations and licensing, it’s not targeted at this point.

“Right now, it’s a bycatch,” he said. “There are no regulations on the emerging shrimp fishery.  It doesn’t say we can’t keep them, but it does say we can sell them. There is no license for them or regulations.”


Opioid Treatment

MARYLAND, – “This opioid crisis deserves the same attention and focus as we’ve given to the COVID-19 pandemic,” State Senator MaryBeth Carozza said.

That attention comes in the form of legislation as Senate Bill 394, the Statewide Target Overdose Prevention Act, increases the use and access to Naloxone which is used to help reverse the effects of an opioid overdose.

The STOP Act, which was originally introduced in 2015, made its way back to the current legislative session. Lawmakers hopes this push will saving as many lives as possible. “This legislation that Governor Hogan introduced is really a powerful tool allowing us to use this miracle drug to save lives  for those who have been most impacted by opioids and opioid abuse,” Senator Carozza said. “Sometimes there’s spikes and jumps with our fatal overdoses in particular locally and a lot of that we think is due to the availability of Narcan and Naloxone,” Worcester County Health Department’s Travis Brown said.

Health experts say that while this expanding access is crucial in the fight to saving lives, the focus must be on the full recovery journey. “They’re so many people in our community that can overcome and well manage their substance abuse but unfortunately they just take a medication with no treatment,” Clinical Psychiatrist for Peninsula Mental Health Services’ Michael Finegan, PhD, ABPP.

“Whenever we see Narcan and Naloxone in distribution we also want to pair it with resources. We have our safe stations here locally where people can enter recovery immediately,” Brown said.

I’m told that help doesn’t have to be left to the professionals. “You never know if you’re going to be walking through a parking lot or a department store and might encounter someone having an overdose. If you have Narcan and Naloxone with you and know how to use it, you might just save that persons life,” Brown said.

The Worcester County Health Department offers Naloxone training for free and provides other opioid addiction resources for those who need them.  To find our more information, call the health department at (410)-632-1100 or click here 

The STOP Act is currently sits in the Senate Finance Committee. The next hearing will be on February 17th. For full story & video:

Maryland lawmakers tackle opioid crisis with new legislation - 47abc (wmdt.com)


K_9 Legislation Saves Canine service dog lives

New legislation could better protect Md. K9s injured in the line of duty

MARYLAND – New legislation could mean the difference between life and death for Maryland K9 officers.

No Clear Guidelines

As it stands right now, if a K9 is hurt while responding to a scene, there aren’t any guidelines for how to give them emergency care. “We would put them in our patrol cars and we get them to the urgent veterinary care as fast as we could,” said DFC Nicole Chaffey with the Wicomico County Sheriff’s Office.

Peace of Mind

But, Senate Bill 70 creates guidelines for EMS providers to render emergency treatment to K9s injured in the line of duty. “This is my best friend, this is my partner, this is somebody who’s going to go into the thick of things. We’re going to be the first through the door, and he’s going to be right there with me,” said DFC Chaffey. “Now I know that if there’s an incident and a tragedy, they’re going to get the care just like we’re going to get the care.”

Bill sponsor State Senator Mary Beth Carozza says not only will the guidelines save K9 lives, they could also help protect law enforcement officers, too. “In those instances where our police canines are injured in the line of duty, we’ll know that emergency medics can come on the scene, treat the dog, and then transport them safely in an ambulance,” she said. “The proper protocols are in place, but also that liability protection is in place. So, we can allow for that emergency medical care.”

Whittington and Wicomico County Sheriff Mike Lewis testified in support of the bill before the Education, Health, and Environmental Affairs Committee. Whittington says the legislation could pave the way to make first responders better prepared for any situation. “Having clear direction and expectations from Maryland Emergency Medical Services, veterinarians, and also the canine handlers allows for us the life-saving care, and the correct care, to the canine unit.”

Four Legs on the Front Lines

K9s are often some of the first to enter an emergency situation or crime scene, according to first responders and law enforcement. That could lead to potentially deadly situations for the K9 and its handler. “They may be put in situations where they may walk over glass or they may be shot or stabbed. They may experience a fentanyl overdose from walking on a drug or anything like that,” said Ryan Whittington with the Ocean City Fire Department.

Sheriff Lewis says the legislation is timely, as K9s getting injured in the line of duty has been a growing concern. “There’s been a major uptick in assaults on law enforcement officers across the country, and our canines. Just last month [in Seattle], we had a police canine – Canine Jedi – that was stabbed to death with a machete,” he said. “To be able to get our four legged partners the assistance they need – that they’ve always needed – is very exciting.”

Confidence in Passage

The bill is now onto its second reading. Sen. Carozza says there may be some future amendments. However, because other states have passed similar laws, she’s confident Governor Larry Hogan will put his pen to this bill, as well. “This bill enjoys strong support across the board. It has the support of law enforcement, it has the support of firefighters, it has the support of veterinarians,” she said.

For full story and video:

https://www.wmdt.com/2022/02/new-legislation-could-better-protect-md-k9s-injured-in-the-line-of-duty/

 

 


Mary Beth Carozza for State Senate